IBRITUMOMAB

(ib ri TYOO mo mab) Brand: In-111 Zevalin, Y-90 Zevalin

What is the most significant information I must know about ibritumomab?

Do not receive this medicine if you are pregnant. It could reason harm to the unborn child. Use an effective form of birth control, and speak your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

Ibritumomab can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. Your blood may need to be tested often. Avoid being around people who are sick or have infections. Avoid activities that may magnify your risk of bleeding injury. Speak your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection.

• Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with ibritumomab, and avoid coming into contact with anyone who has recently received a live vaccine. There is a chance that the virus could be passed on to you.

• Some people receiving ibritumomab have developed "secondary" bone marrow or blood cell cancers such as leukemia. Conversation with your doctor about your individual risk while receiving this medication.

What is ibritumomab?

Ibritumomab is a protein that targets white blood cells in the body. When ibritumomab is attached to a radioactive chemical, the radiation is delivered directly to the tumor (lymphoma).

Ibritumomab is used in combination with another medicines to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Ibritumomab may also be used for purposes than those listed in this medicine guide.

What must I discuss with my healthcare provider till receiving ibritumomab?

• You must not receive this medicine if you are allergic to ibritumomab, or to radioactive chemicals or mouse proteins.

• To create certain you can safely take ibritumomab, speak your doctor if you have any of these another conditions:

· liver disease;

· kidney disease;

· any type of infection;

· lung or breathing problems;

· bleeding or blood clotting problems;

· low platelet counts;

· low blood pressure; or

· a history of heart malady, heart onslaught, angina (chest pain), or irregular heart beats.

• Some people receiving ibritumomab have developed "secondary" bone marrow or blood cell cancers such as leukemia. Conversation with your doctor about your individual risk while receiving this medication.

Ibritumomab is made from human plasma (part of the blood) which may contain viruses and another infectious agents. Donated plasma is tested and treated to reduce the risk of it containing infectious agents, but there is still a little possibility it could transmit malady. Conversation with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

• FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use ibritumomab if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn child. Use effective birth control, and speak your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

• It is not known whether ibritumomab passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing child. Do not receive ibritumomab without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How is ibritumomab given?

Ibritumomab is used in combination with rituximab (Rituxan) and a radioactive chemical. Ibritumomab is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

Ibritumomab is generally given each 7 to 9 days. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Ibritumomab can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can create it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being near others who are ill. Your blood may need to be tested often. Visit your doctor regularly.

What happens if I miss a dose?

• Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your ibritumomab injection.

What happens if I overdose?

• Search abnormal medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

• Overdose symptoms may include weakness, pale skin, and light bruising or bleeding.

What must I avoid while receiving ibritumomab?

• Avoid being around people who are sick or have infections. Speak your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection.

• Do not receive a "live" vaccine while using ibritumomab, and avoid coming into contact with anyone who has recently received a live vaccine. There is a chance that the virus could be passed on to you. Live vaccines include measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), oral polio, rotavirus, smallpox, typhoid, yellow fever, varicella (chickenpox), H1N1 influenza, and nasal flu vaccine.

What are the possible side effects of ibritumomab?

• Some people receiving an ibritumomab injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medication is injected into the vein). Speak your caregiver right away if you feel dizzy, nauseated, light-headed, sweaty, itchy, or have a quick heartbeat, trouble breathing, chest pain or hard feeling, or pain spreading to the hand or shoulder. These reactions can occur during the injection or within 24 hours afterward.

• Get abnormal medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your person, lips, tongue, or throat.

• Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

· pain, burning, redness, or skin changes where the medication was injected;

· fever with chills, body aches, and another flu symptoms;

· light bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

· white patches or sores internal your mouth or on your lips; or

· severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your person or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the person or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

• Smaller serious side effects may include:

· nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite;

· anxiety;

· dizziness; or

· joint pain.

• This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may message side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What another drugs will affect ibritumomab?

• Till receiving ibritumomab, speak your doctor if you are using any type of blood thinner or medicine used to prevent blood clots, such as:

· abciximab (ReoPro)

· alteplase (Activase);

· anagrelide (Agrylin);

· argatroban (Acova);

· aspirin;

· bivalirudin (Angiomax)

· cilostazol (Pletal);

· clopidogrel (Plavix);

· dabigatran (Pradaxa);

· dalteparin (Fragmin);

· dipyridamole (Persantine, Aggrenox);

· enoxaparin (Lovenox)

· eptifibatide (Integrelin);

· fondaparinux (Arixtra);

· lepirudin (Refludan);

· prasugrel (Effient);

· rivaroxaban (Xarelto);

· tenecteplase (TNKase);

· ticlopidine (Ticlid);

· tinzaparin (Innohep);

· tirofiban (Aggrastat);

· urokinase (Abbokinase); or

· warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven).

• This list is not complete and there may be another drugs that can interact with ibritumomab. Speak your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal commodity, and drugs predesigned by another doctors. Do not start using a new medicine without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

• Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about ibritumomab.

Remember, hold this and all another medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medicine only for the indication prescribed.

Disclaim: Each effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses external of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way must be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safety, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the help of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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© 2006-2018 medpill.info Last Updated On: 08/08/2018 (0)
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